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The University of Manchester Library's Statement of Public Task

The University of Manchester Library is subject to the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015 (PSI Regulations).

The public task of The University of Manchester Library, under the PSI Regulations, consists of the principal activity outlined below:

to provide permission to use digital copies of images, manuscripts, documents, and objects in our collections for re-use in publications or through other media.

Re-use of our digital images can enhance teaching, research, instruction, publication, and public understanding and enjoyment.

Requests for re-use of information

If you wish to apply for access to our information under the PSI Regulations please see our permissions pages.

Please note, the PSI Regulations only govern the re-use of information. To obtain copies of personal data, or other information held by The University of Manchester, please make a Subject Access Request or a Freedom of Information Request

Pricing structure for re-use of information

Many digital images are free to download via our Manchester Digital Collections (formerly LUNA).The Library does not charge permissions fees for re-use of digitised content. Our standard imaging prices will apply for supply of high resolution images.

Right to refuse

The University of Manchester Library reserves the right to refuse requests for re-use of information under the PSI Regulations where valid exceptions apply. Should this occur, the reason for refusal will be clearly explained, along with details on how to appeal that decision.

Review of Public Task Statement

This statement is reviewed biennially and is due to be considered again in 2019. If you have any queries on this public task statement, or a complaint about The University of Manchester Library under the PSI Regulations, you can submit them to Associate Director of The John Rylands Library and the John Rylands Research Institute.

Date: May 2017

This page was published on 21 June 2017

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